Warsaw, Indiana and other non-Polish oddities

Polish place names crop up all over North America and other parts of the globe settled by Poles. Nothing particularly amazing about that, but when you’re lying in bed with the dreaded January virus it’s possible to become a little obsessed with looking them all up. From there it’s a small step to collecting photos of all these geographical orphans, and from there it’s more or less inevitable that one will move on to putting together a blog post about it. It’s a cycle with all the hideous inevitability of the slippery slope from sniffing magic markers to crack cocaine.

warsaw-kentucky-1

You spelled Warszawa wrong

The Warsaws

North America boasts at least 15 Warsaws. Like a big lummox I always assumed this was because people from Warsaw migrated there and couldn’t be bothered to think of a new name for their new town. In fact the proliferation of Warsaws in the United States was politically motivated. In 1794 in Poland Tadeusz Kościuszko led a rebellion against the occupying powers of the Second Partition. The rebellion failed and even more Poles found it advisable to seek a new life in the New World. Working from first hand accounts she had heard from these refugees the American author Jane Porter wrote Thaddeus of Warsaw (published 1803) an historical novel based on the uprising and the deeds of Kościuszko, who was already an heroic figure in the US for the prominent role he had played in the American Revolution (War of Independence) twenty years earlier. The novel was a huge success and all sorts of people got excited about Kościuszko all over again. Many of them got so excited that they decided Warsaw was a much better name for a town than, say, Buffalobuttock or Thiswilldoville, so they changed it. Almost none of these towns had any significant Polish population at the time.

To add to the confusion some of the brighter communities remembered that Thaddeus (Tadeusz) wasn’t actually from Warsaw and decided to call their towns Kosciusko instead (two surviving communities; one in Mississippi and one in Texas), and some Polish immigrants also decided to change the names of their towns from New Szczecin or Nowy Katowice to Warsaw for simplicity’s sake.

Warsaw, Kosciusko County, Indiana

warsaw-indiana-tool-supply

Warsaw, Indiana… they have tools.

Warsaw, Indiana is by far the largest of the surviving US communities to bear the name, with a present-day population of about 13,000.

Interesting facts: The town’s motto is “Orthopedic Capital of the World,” which is probably why you’ve never met anybody who admits to coming from there. The first resident to install a telephone was Dr. Eggleston in 1882: his number was Warsaw 1. A shady sounding character by the name of Paul E. “Mike” Hodges was mayor four times between 1952 and 1983 and I like to believe he looked a lot like Boss Hogg off the Dukes of Hazard.

Best website quote: “In addition to orthopedics, Warsaw: 1) is the home of the largest printing presses in the world, 2) home to the world’s largest manufacturer of projection screens, and 3) home of the famous CoCo Wheat’s breakfast cereal.” Just how big are those printing presses?


Warsaw, Duplin County, North Carolina

warsaw-n-carolina_200-w-hill-st

West Hill Street, Warsaw, North Carolina. Ain’t no trains a commin…

Interesting facts: Originally known as Mooresville the town changed it’s name to Warsaw in 1855. Told you it was true.

Best website quote: “During the same year, a merchant named Thaddeus Love moved to town to be the stationmaster of the Duplin Depot. At the time, a biography of a Polish national hero, Tadeusz Kosciuszko, was extremely popular. The Joane Porter book, entitled Thaddeus of Warsaw, furnished Thaddeus Love a catchy nickname. In fact, Love’s nickname was so appealing, that by 1847, the community was already known in legal circles as “Warsaw Depot.” When the town was incorporated in 1855, the community was officially designated as Warsaw.”

Warsaw, Gallatin County, Kentucky

warsaw-kentucky

Small town America… they have hardware

The third-largest of the American Warsaws, just.

Interesting facts: Erm…

Best website quote: “The city has a total area of 1.5 square miles of which 1.0 square mile is land and 0.5 square mile is water.” So, a third of your city is under water, perhaps you should be twinned with Wrocław?

Warsaw, Hancock County, Illinois

warsaw-illinois_564-main-st

The Warsaw post office. You have to wonder what would happen if you posted a letter to Warsaw Illinois in Warsaw Masovia, somewhere a post office employee would just explode surely.

Interesting facts: The first settlement in the area was a fort established by future US president Zachary Taylor to fight the British. Well it’s a fact anyway.

Best website quote: “Whether just passing through or staying for awhile, there are no strangers here in Warsaw.” That might just be because nobody ever goes there.

Warsaw, Richmond County, Virginia

warsaw-virginia

Warsaw, Virginia is for lovers. You can tell I’m running out of real information can’t you

Interesting facts: “Warsaw was originally called Richmond County Courthouse. It was renamed Warsaw in 1831 in sympathy for the Polish struggle for liberty”. I’m sure the Polish struggle felt much better, if not much more liberated.

Best website quote: “To have your child seat inspected, please call 804-333-3737 for an appointment.”

Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York

warsaw-new-york

Warsaw, New York… you can turn left there

Interesting facts, website favorite thing… whatever: “Warsaw’s growth and its physical appearance was especially influenced by the salt industry. Between 1878 and 1894 Warsaw became the nation’s largest producer of table salt.” A whole sixteen years at the pinnacle of the table salt industry can be a powerful rush for a town.

Warsaw, Sumter County, Alabama

warsaw-alabama

Now that’s a small town…

warsaw-alabama1

…also not a very busy one

Warsaw, Walsh County, North Dakota

warsaw-north-dakota

There’s a definite tool, or should I say tuel, theme to these places

A genuine Polish community! Apparently it remained largely Polish-speaking until the mid 20th century. It has about 200 residents and a Catholic church (St. Stanislaus’ of course) big enough to accommodate the population of Nebraska.

Warsaw, Washington County, Mississippi

warsaw_mississippi

Warsaw, Mississippi seems to consist of just this bend in the road with its bike/tractor bar

Warsaw, Rice County, Minnesota

warsaw-minnesota1

A sign! A sign!

warsaw-minnesota

This is the kind of road that says “Why are you living in Warsaw Minnesota… get out now!”

Warsaw, Kaufman County, Texas

warsaw-texas-1

See comment above on the usefulness of roads

Interesting facts: “The site was settled before 1840 and called Warsaw Prairie. A post office operated in the settlement from 1847 through 1858. The community had a population of fifteen and two businesses in 1936. Afterward, however, Warsaw stabilized at about sixty residents; fifty-eight persons lived there in 1988 and 1990”. ‘Stabilized’ may be a polite term.

Other places

Perhaps surprisingly there seem to be very few communities named after Polish cities other than Warsaw. There are a scattering of Danzigs, Breslaus, and Stettins (the former, German names, of Gdansk, Wrocław, and Szczecin respectively) but few others. These are some of the exceptions, all of which seem to have been Polish immigrant communities.

Lublin, Taylor County, Wisconsin

lublin-wisconsin

If there’s ever a fire in the village hall they’re sorted

lublin-wisconsin2

Interesting facts: Population: 108. Churches: St. Stanislaus Catholic Church, St. Mary’s Polish National Church, Holy Assumption Orthodox Church. Town president: Bill Wisniewski.

Best website quote: “Special Features of Lublin: Pig Roast, Municipal Sewer system, Senior citizen nutrition site, …and more!”

Silesia, Carbon County, Montana

silesia-montana

The road to Silesia, Montana if you dare

Torun, Portage County, Wisconsin

torun-wisconsin

Not even a usable Google Earth image of this place

Torun, Wisconsin is part of the larger originally Polish community of Portage County. Other communities in the area include Plover, Ellis, Amherst, Custer, and Polonia.

Breslau, Pierce County, Nebraska

breslau-nebraska

Maybe it was a town once

Danzig, McIntosh County, North Dakota

danzig-north-dakota2

Danzig, North Dakota in about 1915

danzig-north-dakota

Danzig, North Dakota cemetery today. Either headstones weren’t in fashion or this was an undead community.

Clearly a German-speaking community, but included here for completeness.

Best website quote:
“I am writing this history of my hometown, Danzig, North Dakota, simply because I do not want it to be forgotten.”

That other Poland

poland-kiribati

If you must live in a Poland, why not this one?

The Pacific island of Kiritimati, formerly known as Christmas Island, has four settlement: Poland, London, Paris, and Banana (honest). Poland, Kiribati has a population of about 250 and apparently got its name thanks to the efforts of a Polish sailor who helped the local inhabitants build an irrigation system.

poland-kiribati1

Poland, from above

In the 1950s Britain put a bit of a crimp in property prices on the island by conducting a series of nuclear weapons tests there (Operation Grapple). At a dull moment in dinner-table conversation you can point out the Britain once nuked Christmas, Poland, and London all at the same time.

If you’re reading this and you’re from one of these places say hello, and I apologize in advance for taking the mick.

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51 thoughts on “Warsaw, Indiana and other non-Polish oddities

  1. Kuba says:

    Thanks for all the towns named after Polish towns. Never knew we had so many here in the US. Let me know if you find a Zatorowisna in the US that’s where my family is from………

  2. Phlegm Kildildehopher says:

    No restaurants?

  3. Gabriela says:

    Very nice research. We have no Warsaws nor similar in Peru though… but several Perus in the U.S. It seems that at some point of History, city founders run out of names!

  4. scatts says:

    Yeah, come on, Island, where’s all the restaurants in Krakow man! ;)

    Why is it that the one with the real Polish community, and a Polish eagle even, is the one that spells tool as ‘tuel’? Is this Polish humour, local dialect or just trying to reinforce American feelings about Polish IQ scores?

  5. Fëanor says:

    Not just Polish place names in the US, there’s also the Pulaski Skyway, a rather terrific piece of bridge engineering in New Jersey, named after Kazimierz Pułaski who trained American cavalrymen and fought against the British during the revolutionary wars.

  6. Pawel says:

    Aaaah…. you even found Torun:))

    American copycats! They coud have asked the indians what are places called, but no! ;>

  7. adthelad says:

    Excellent post – but wow, I bet you haven’t exhagerated about how much time it must have taken. Like cocaine addiction you say?

    Let’s see …..’I’ve got the I didn’t wake up this morning cos I’ve been up all night blogging blues’ …..yep, works for me! :))))

  8. Jacek Wesołowski says:

    Well, there is Chicago.

  9. cracovianka says:

    Fantastic – that was time well spent in the service of humanity! Hope you get better – but not too soon as I think there’s more where that came from. e.g. there’s an Ewa in Hawaii…

  10. island1 says:

    It was a tad research intensive.

    Annoying that I couldn’t find a Krakow (or Cracow). Google claims there’s a place called Cracow, Banana, Queensland, but I can’t find it on any map.

    Cracovianka and other people who mentioned other Polish place names: There are lots and lots of them it’s true. For example, there are at least 8 towns in the US called Poland and god knows how many mountains, lakes, rivers, roads, bridges etc. named after Poles.

  11. Cristóbal says:

    In Chile, there is a small farmer town called “Polonia” which is curiously next to “Roma” and close enough from “Peor es nada”. I don’t think there are Polish people there, though.

    Greetings from Chile! I’ve been following the blog for a while, and it’s been really fun. Congrats.

  12. island1 says:

    This is a good place to search if you’re interested:

    http://www.maplandia.com/

    not infallible though; doesn’t list Warsaw, Indiana for instance.

  13. island1 says:

    Cristóbal: Thanks. You never know, Poles crop up everywhere!

  14. Bronwyn Klimach says:

    Hmmm,
    and here I am hoping you get better really FAST!!
    Looks like I am in the minority :(
    Kind regards,
    Bronwyn.

  15. MaterialGirl says:

    On Manilla’s (if I remember good) airport there’s a welcoming inscription “Gowno darmo” (shit for free) :D what means supposedly “Cordially welcome”!

  16. island1 says:

    Scatts: I wondered about the ‘tuel’ myself.

  17. AnetaCuse says:

    And in upstate New York we have Warsaw (mentioned here), Poland, and Pulaski.

  18. anglopole says:

    Hmm…. I haven’t realized Americans loved Warsaw so much! ;-) I wonder if there is a Warsaw in the UK? I’m sure there are places here that could be renamed as Warsaw or Krakow! ;-))

  19. […] compendium of U.S. towns with Polish names – at Polandian. Posted by Veronica Khokhlova  Print version Share […]

  20. island1 says:

    Hi Aneta, ever been to these places? What are they like?

    anglopole: No Warsaws only a Walsall, but I’ve certainly heard parts of London referred to as Little Poland.

  21. AnetaCuse says:

    Island1: I’ve only been to Pulaski. It is a small town north of Syracuse near Lake Ontario known for fishing and camping in the summer and snowmobiling in the winter. I drove by Warsaw and Poland, they are small villages near the Adirondacks Mountains. Don’t blink when you drive by or you’ll miss them ;).

  22. phlojd k-jammer says:

    Do any of these towns have any good “breastaurants” like these?

    http://www.star-telegram.com/100/story/1163904.html

  23. phlojd k-jammer says:

    Actually, Warsaw NY is near the Allegheny Mountains in the southwestern part of the state, nearer Lake Erie. It is tiny and you can actually turn left or right from that intersection but can’t go straight.

    And the Valley Inn Restaurant is highly recommended:

    http://local.yahoo.com/info-11755878-valley-inn-restaurant-warsaw

  24. phlojd k-jammer says:

    And you can even take a virtual walking tour of the town:

    http://warsawhistory.org/

  25. island1 says:

    phlojd: Probably. But did you know Poland has its very own breastaurant chain called Rooster?

    http://www.rooster.pl/pl/warszawa/kalendarz_2008/

    We actually have two of them in Krakow now. There you are – restaurants in Krakow, job done.

  26. Phlojd Katzenjammer says:

    Once again disproving any contention that the Polandian is not in tune with the highest peaks of Polish culture!

  27. A few years back I lived not far from Lublin, Wisconsin. It boasts the highest per capita suicide rate in the country (OK, maybe just the state.)

  28. richardlith says:

    anglopole. There may not be a Warsaw, by there is the village of Moscow iin Ayrshire, Scotland. Not, in fact, named after the Russian capital, (no-one knows where the name came from), though they did rename the local river the Volga during the Napoleonic Wars.

  29. agreablement says:

    passo per caso nel tuo blog
    un saluto from Italy, ciao

  30. Cristóbal says:

    I finally found a pic of Polonia, Chile.

  31. […] the Polandian blog: Warsaw, Indiana and other non-Polish oddities Polish place names crop up all over North America and other parts of the globe settled by Poles. […]

  32. ragman says:

    In Turkey we can find Polonezkoy(or Adampol). It was founded in 1842 by Polish settlers. Polonezkoy means polish village. :)

  33. island1 says:

    Cristóbal: Good work :) I’m betting it does have a Polish connection. “Polonia” is the term often used to describe Polish migrants.

    Pawel: You star! Have those Amerykas always been called Ameryka or did they change their names post 1990?

    Ragman: Excellent! This is turning into a world gazetter of Polish place names.

  34. DC says:

    Hi Island – what an interesting post! In answer to your question, I’ve been through Warsaw, NY a few times as it is along one of my variations on the drive from Washington to my hometown in the Buffalo NY area. This is an area of pleasant small towns surrounded by farms. It’s on the edge of where the Appalachian mountains run through New York State and it’s a nice drive through the rolling hills. One of the things this part of New York is known for are the “lake effect” snow storms that blow in from Lake Erie. A few years ago we got nearly 2 meters of snow in less than 3 days. Unlike DC, people up there mellow out during these storms and the local bars are packed! I love it.

    Years ago while on business in Texas, I noticed a Cestohowa on the map (this was before the Internet), and nearby Panna Maria, Koscuiska (!) and Pawelekville. So of course I had to drive there and check it out. My hopes of finding a Polish restaurant were unsatisfied (nearly impossible unless you are in NYC, Chicago, Buffalo or Detroit) but I had a quick look around town. Here’s some background:

    http://www.angelfire.com/tx5/texasczech/Silesian%20Texas/Cestohowa.htm

    and

    http://www.texasescapes.com/SouthTexasTowns/CestohowaTx/CestohowaTexas.htm

    Apparently the name was changed to protect our delicate American tongues. It was really quiet when I went through. If you are imagining tumbleweed blowing across the roads, you’re not far off the mark.

  35. DC says:

    Scatts, Island – There are 3 published telephone numbers for the name “Tuel” in North Dakota. One is in Minto, ND which is the mailing address for Warsaw, since Warsaw itself is unincorporated. So I guess the bar is named after the owner. I can always call them if you are unsatisfied with my theory – heh heh.

    The other 2 listings are in Fargo. If you haven’t seen the movie of the same name, it’s a good one. As a sub-theme, they make fun of the accent found in this part of the country, which is known for it’s immigration from Scandinavia.

  36. DC says:

    Yes, how strange Warsaw is so popular as a name, and Krakow is not. But I found one:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krakow_Township,_Michigan

    Nearby on the map are Posen and Polaski.

  37. island1 says:

    DC: Hooray! There is a Krakow! I thought there had to be one somewhere.

    I was afraid places with ‘adapted’ spellings would slip through my net. There must be others like Cestohowa. Nice find.

    So it’s Mr Tuel. I dare you to call and ask if there’s a Mr Hugh G Tuel there, they’ve probably never heard that one.

    By sheer coincidence I actually watched Fargo again the other week. A classic and worth a viewing just for Mike Yanagita.

  38. DC says:

    Uh, that’s Ms Tuel to you. Debra actually, so I don’t think I can do it. I’m shy like that. Too bad it’s not Randall Tuel.

    Since the one Krakow made you happy, there is also one in Alberta. Doesn’t show up on Google maps, but Statistics Canada mentions it. There’s also a Warsaw, Ontario.

  39. Pioro-Boncza says:

    Jaksiemasz!

    If you have ever seen the Borat film, there is a scene where he goes on some local US television station for an interview somewhere in the Appalachian South (not sure where..Kentucky maybe?). Afterwards, they cut to the weatherman (whom Borat later disturbs) who is trying to forecast the weather for Kosciuszko. But he pronounces it “Cause-cow-sko”!!!! Poor poor Thaddeus.

    Dzienkuje! (in my best Borat accent)

  40. DC says:

    Pioro-Boncza,

    But it gets worse. Have you ever heard the Midnight Oil song “Kosciusko?” It’s on the “Red Sails in the Sunset” album. If you have iTunes you can preview the song for the pronunciation, or with Amazon but you might need to be in the US for Amazon. The guy in Borat does far better than Midnight Oil.

    Yet I guess the Australians can be forgiven since the highest mountain in Oz is called “Mount Kosciusko.”

    There is also a brand of mustard in the US called Kosciusko. I have no idea why. When I’ve heard it pronounced here, it was quite close to the guy in Borat.

  41. Ranielle Harris says:

    Since Warsaw Indiana is where I was born and raised…I felt the urge to chime in here. Mike Hodges was indeed Mayor 4 times; from 1952–1955, 1960–1963, 1968–1975, and 1980–1983. City Hall was built in 1952 by Mayor Mike Hodges, who owned a construction business. City Hall originally had four large overhead doors for the fire department. What is now Fire Station #2 at 2204 E. Center Street was built in 1978, and the east part of City Hall was converted into the Council Chambers. Fire Station #1 at 109 E. Main Street was built in 1982. Hodges is currently Vice President and Corporate Treasurer, Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana. I tried to find a link to his picture, but alas was unsuccessful. If memory serves me right, he does not resemble Boss Hog in the least little bit.

    Now on to those Presses you mentioned. The presses are located at R.R.Donnelly & Sons, Old Route 30 West P.O. Box 837. Warsaw, Indiana 46580. What do the World Book Encyclopedia, the latest upgrade from Microsoft, National Equirer and the Land’s End fall catalog all have in common? They were formatted, printed and distributed from sites in Indiana.

    The state’s largest commercial printer, Chicago-based R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co., is also the world’s largest, With more than 32,000 employees at some 140 locations and production facilities worldwide, the Fortune 500 company has been a leader in print
    and information services since its founding in 1864.

    Donnelley’s Indiana operations, which include two plants each in both Warsaw and Crawfordsville, employ more than 5,000 Hoosier workers to produce, a full spectrum of publishing products. Part of the catalog division in Donnelley’s Merchandise Media Group, the plants are undergoing a $90 million expansion and upgrade that will “replace old equipment as well as create additional capacity for existing clients,” the expansion, which adds 200,000 square feet and should provide a long-term increase in the Warsaw operations’ 1,700-member work force, is designed to offer more flexibility in product size, printing capacity and distribution. And those are important factors for customers like lands’ End, Eddie Bauer, JC Penney, Dayton Hudson, Tandy and Spiegal, among others. The Warsaw facility is the only one that prints the J.C.Penny catalogs exclusively.
    The presses mentioned are giant, building sized contraptions sent to Warsaw from operations in Germany…hence the reason the workers at Donnelly’s call them the “Germany Presses” Most EVeryone in my family has worked there in their lives (Yes, I did too) and my step-father is currently employed in the Public Relations Department. He started out with RR Donnelly & Sons when he was 18, and it’s the only company he’s EVER worked for.
    Okay, enjoy your reading, and I hope this was just a little enlightening to all ;~)

  42. DC says:

    Hi Ranielle –

    Do you have any further insight into the naming of the town? Is there any significant immigrant connection from Poland?

    I think I might know Island’s next question…

  43. island1 says:

    Ranielle: Hooray! I real live Varsovian of the US variety. Thanks for dropping by and providing the extra information. Kind of disappointing about Mr Hodges though.

  44. as says:

    RR Donnelly established a printers in Nowa Huta on part of the site of the steelworks – so there’s a nice full circle connection.

  45. boattown_guest says:

    No Łódź! No Lodz! I found Wootze but it’s in Germany.

  46. Ranielle Harris says:

    Hello again all, I’ve come back to reveal a few more facts about Warsaw Indiana, USA…
    Recreational areas abound in Warsaw and Kosciusko County. Visit the Lake City Greenway, a trail that traverses between Warsaw and Winona Lake with approximately 4.5 miles completed to date. The CCAC (City-County Athletic Complex) is located on the west side of Warsaw where over 3,000 softball and soccer games are played each year. The Wagon Wheel Playhouse, a theatre in the round, hosts concerts and plays throughout the year. In addition, more than 20 golf courses are located within 45 minutes of Warsaw. Kosciusko County has 103 lakes, including Indiana’s largest natural lake (Lake Wawasee near Syracuse) at over 3,000 acres and Indiana’s deepest natural lake (Tippecanoe Lake north of Warsaw) at nearly 120 feet. Warsaw itself has three lakes within its corporate limits (Center, Pike, and Winona Lake), offering every form of watersports. Only four of the seventeen townships in the county do not have any lakes, and most of the lakes are located north of U.S. 30. There are twelve lakes located in the state-owned Tri-County Fish and Wildlife Area, which are the responsibility of the Department of Natural Resources.

    Kosciusko County was formally organized in 1836. It is the fourth largest of the State’s 92 counties, containing 558 square miles. The County contains more than 100 lakes, which are directly responsible for the tourist and recreational economy of the County. Kosciusko County today continues to be one of the leading agricultural producing counties in the State.

    Warsaw, named for the capital of Poland, was platted October 21, 1836 and was incorporated March 8, 1854 with 752 inhabitants. Warsaw was a village for about 18 years. Early Warsaw contained traders, trappers, and merchants supplying manufactured goods to the area’s farmers. Because of its central location in the County’s lake region, tourists soon began visiting Warsaw and eventually made permanent residences in the City. Industry soon followed. The abundant water supply, growing labor force, close proximity to markets and energy sources provided industry with the basic needs for successful operations.

    The first plat of Warsaw was filed by W. H. Knott, proprietor, on October 21, 1836. Matthew D. Springer built the first house in Warsaw. It was a tamarack pole cabin on the north edge of the tamarack swamp, which included all the land immediately east and south of the Big 4 RR passenger depot. It was also used as a tavern. The Warsaw Post Office was established February 11, 1837, and Jacob Baker was its first postmaster. The first industries to arise in Warsaw were the blacksmith shop on South Buffalo Street of Phillip Lash and the chair shop of John Giselman on the northwest corner of Detroit and Main Streets, which were both opened in 1836. H. Higby started the first furniture shop in 1837.

    The first election for officials of Kosciusko County was held on Monday, April 4, 1836. A sheriff, three commissioners, two associate judges, clerk-auditor, recorder, surveyor and coroner were elected. Between 1837 and 1839, the County built two courthouses. When the County Commissioners advertised for bids, William Cosgrove and his brother were successful in acquiring the contract to construct the courthouse. The first, at the northeast corner of Center and Indiana Streets, burned down before it was used. The second was on the west edge of where the first was located, and was used until 1848 when the present courthouse in the center of the Courthouse Square was completed.
    In August of 1845, the Kosciusko Republican was the first newspaper published in the county, by Charles L. Murray in the town of Monoquet. It was soon followed by the Warsaw Democrat in 1848, operated by T. L. Graves. The Kosciusko Republican was then taken over by Reub Williams and G.W. Fairbrother, and they started The Northern Indianian in January of 1856 (weekly, every Thursday).

    Through the years, it became the Daily Times. During 1938, the corporation purchased the Warsaw Union, publishing all three editions daily. Because of scarcity of help during WW II, publication of the Warsaw Union, as well as the Daily Times morning editions, were dropped in 1942. The Times and Union were then consolidated into the evening Times-Union. The Times-Union began publication of its Saturday edition as a morning newspaper in 1980.
    The railroad era began in Kosciusko County when the Pennsylvania Railroad (Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroad) reached Pierceton in May of 1853. It was completed to Warsaw in November of 1854, and soon afterward a station was built. George Moon was the first agent at Warsaw. The north/south extension of the Big 4 RR (Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis) through Kosciusko County was a railroad movement from Michigan. The section between Goshen and Warsaw was completed and the first train left Warsaw going north in August of 1870.

    In March 1854, Andrew J. Power and John Rogers petitioned the County Commissioners that Warsaw might be incorporated as a town. According to law, they represented more than one-third of the voters within the limits of the town intended to be incorporated. The census taken on February 4, 1854, indicated there were 752 residents within the town limits.

    After Warsaw had continued under town government for 21 years, its people decided that it had reached its majority and was entitled to a municipal form. Several years passed as a town before the efforts of the citizens to provide adequate educational advantages and a reasonable measure of protection against fire took definite form. The year 1858 was most fruitful of the earlier times in these regards. It was during this year that the first public school of Warsaw was opened. In charge was Professor D. T. Johnson, who subsequently was Principal of the grade school. It is said that the building contained three rooms on the ground floor and one large room above. Five teachers were employed.

    The railroad era began in Kosciusko County when the Pennsylvania Railroad (Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroad) reached Pierceton in May of 1853. It was completed to Warsaw in November of 1854, and soon afterward a station was built. George Moon was the first agent at Warsaw. The north/south extension of the Big 4 RR (Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis) through Kosciusko County was a railroad movement from Michigan. The section between Goshen and Warsaw was completed and the first train left Warsaw going north in August of 1870.

    In March 1854, Andrew J. Power and John Rogers petitioned the County Commissioners that Warsaw might be incorporated as a town. According to law, they represented more than one-third of the voters within the limits of the town intended to be incorporated. The census taken on February 4, 1854, indicated there were 752 residents within the town limits.

    After Warsaw had continued under town government for 21 years, its people decided that it had reached its majority and was entitled to a municipal form. Several years passed as a town before the efforts of the citizens to provide adequate educational advantages and a reasonable measure of protection against fire took definite form. The year 1858 was most fruitful of the earlier times in these regards. It was during this year that the first public school of Warsaw was opened. In charge was Professor D. T. Johnson, who subsequently was Principal of the grade school. It is said that the building contained three rooms on the ground floor and one large room above. Five teachers were employed.

    All of these facts and much, much more can be found at https://polandian.wordpress.com/2009/01/26/warsaw-indiana-and-other-non-polish-oddities/

    Hope this clears up any questions you all may have in regards to my home town of Warsaw, Indiana USA

    Happy reading, Ranielle Harris

  47. […] [Comments for Polandian] Comment on Warsaw, Indiana and other non-Polish oddities by Ranielle Harris […]

  48. island1 says:

    Ranielle: Busy beaver. Next time I’m in Kentucky I’ll be sure to drop by.

    Why don’t you add all this to the Wikipedia page.

    Did you mean to include a link to this post in your comment?

  49. Kyle says:

    I live not far from Poland, Ohio…can’t say I know much about its history though.

  50. Michał Kamola says:

    I’m from Poland, but I live in Dublin, Ireland now. After reading your blog I suddenly felt an urge to go and visit mr(ms?) Tuel and complement them in polish on their White Eagle.

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