Tag Archives: Polish people

The Hottest Polish Politician Contest – the Men

We’re back with the all-male finals of our Hottest Polish Politician contest. We are looking for one guy and one gal to become the Hottest Polish Polish Politician of the year.  We will send the lucky winner a bilingual diploma they can hang in their office and show off to their friends.

Last week the women’s final was featured on the national nightly news programe TVN Fakty. We’re too scared to imagine where this week’s contest might end up… 80% of the 460 Members of the Sejm are men – if this balance was recreated in out contest, we would have 40 male contestants.

Both contests will last one more week and then we announce the winners! Yay!

Contestant number 1

Sławomir Nowak is a 34-year-old MP from Gdańsk representing the Civic Platform party (centre-right) since 2004. Currently he holds the position of Secretary of State at the Chancellery of the Prime Minister of Poland. He is also the head of Prime-Minister’s political cabinet. He graduated from international relations at Gdańsk University and from management at Gdynia Maritime University. He has worked in advertising. Politically he was involved in liberal youth movement.

The Baltic Sea attracts windsufers from all over the Sejm
When you’re ready Mr Nowak we’ll try it on the water shall we?
Jak to na wojence ładnie
On his way to the Madonna concert

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Contestant number 2

Paweł Olszewski is a 30-year-old lawyer from Bydgoszcz, who also happens to be Civic Platform MP (centre-right). He manages exports for a furniture manufacturer. He was a spokesman for his party in the Kuyavia-Pomerania region and for three years he was a member of Bydgoszcz City Council.

In his own words: “My participation in socio-political life are a result of the wonderful years I spent in the Young Democrats association. There we learned how to successfully fight for our rights and take an active part in local political life.”

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Okay, so I hit the yellow ball with the stick, right?
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At the More Rights for Gingers rally

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Contestant number 3

Dawid Jackiewicz is a 36-year-old MP from Wrocław. He represents the Law and Justice party in the Sejm. During the Kaczynski era he held the post of Deputy Minister for the Treasury.

He should relaunch his website so that we could write something more about him.

Law and Order
Law and Order
Caught by tabloid photographer in a shopping centre with his friend during an important parliament debat! Naughty... but who wouldn't understand a passion for shoes?
Caught by a tabloid photographer in a shopping centre during an important parliamentary debate! Naughty… but who doesn’t understand a passion for shoes?

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Contestant number 4

Michał Jaros is a 28-year-old  MP from Wrocław. Born in Aleksandrów Kujawski (Kuyavia-Pomerania) he moved south to study at the Wrocław University of Economics. There he became an active member of a student’s union. Local Civic Platform noticed him, and offered a place on Wrocław City Council lists. He was elected, and after two years he was offered a good place on parliamentary election list.

His campaign became famous when he used a picture of a woman’s bum in tight jeans on his leaflet, coupled with the slogan “satisfaction guaranteed”.

Young MP donates blood
DNA tests to prove he’s old enough to be an MP
Elegant and friendly
At the student’s union bash

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Contestant number 5

Michał Marcinkiewicz is, at 25, the youngest MP in the Polish Sejm. He represents Civic Platform and his home town of Szczecin. From 2002–04 he worked in the European Parliament. He is the president of Morze Bałtyk Szczecin volleyball team.

In his own words: “I can honestly say – Szczecin is my city. I was born and raised here. Here I got my education and my first professional experiences. Here I met many good and interesting people. I feel a strong emotional bond with this city, and since I remember I wanted Szczecin to be the place to live comfortably.”

Voulez-vous (aha!) Take it now or leave it (aha!) Now is all we get (aha!) .... Nothing promised, no regrets Voulez-vous (aha!) Ain't no big decision (aha!) You know what to do (aha!) La question c'est voulez-vous
♫ Voulez-vous (aha!) Take it now or leave it (aha!) Now is all we get (aha!) …. Nothing promised, no regrets …. Voulez-vous (aha!) Ain’t no big decision (aha!) You know what to do (aha!) La question c’est voulez-vous ♫

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A Ku-Ku!

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Contestant number 6:

Łukasz Zbonikowski from Toruń is a 31-year-old lawyer and an MP representing the Law and Justice party in the Sejm. He is a professional politician: after experiences with the students’ union he began a career in the City Council of Włocławek in 1998, and was assigned to several political posts. He is the chairman of the Polish-Irish Parliament Group.

A Cypriot hotel accused Mr Zbonikowski of destroying a golf cart. The Speaker of the Sejm suspended his right to represent the Polish Parliament at the Council of Europe.

Mr Zbonikowski is a basketball enthusiast
Mr Zbonikowski is a basketball enthusiast
With children who came to see the very building where all the silly laws are being created
With children who came to see the very building where all the silly laws are being created

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Contestant number 7:

Donald Tusk from Gdańsk is a 51-year-old history graduate, an MP and the current Prime Minister of Poland. His Platforma Obywatelska party (centre-right) won the 2007 election. During the communist period he was actively enganed in opposition, for which he was fired from his job. For seven years had been doing physical work in a co-coperative society. After the collapse of  communism he was active in politics in liberal movements. He is one of the co-founders of Platforma Obywatelska.

He plays football every Thursday evening.

Scarf, 29.99
Scarf, 29.99, winning the election 29,000,000.00, seeing your opponents defeat live: priceless
Happy birthday mister president
Mr Tusk at Mme Tussaud’s

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Contestant number 8:

Paweł Poncyliusz from Warsaw is a 40-year-old MP (since 2001) representing the Law and Justice party in the Sejm. Since childhood he has been involved with the scouting movement. He studies history at the Warsaw University. For 8 years he was running his own business. He became famous when he agreed to a tabloid Fakt proposal to live for just 500 zł (120 euro) a month – the amount equivalent to what is left from a minimum wage after paying bills. The most popular Polish paper reported on his adventures everyday for a month.

In his own words: “Recently I became interested in impressionist paintings and Flemish painters”.

The White Party
The White Party
Always make sure there is no farting pillow on your seat when in public
Always make sure there is no farting pillow on your seat when in public

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Contestant number 9:

Damian Raczkowski is a 34-year-old law graduate and an MP from Białystok. He represents the Civic Platform party (centre-right) in the Sejm. He worked as a labour inspector (for a government institution controlling how businesses observe workers’ rights), and a realty manager for a local branch of Polish Rail.

Mr Raczkowski loves martial arts and has been training in taekwon-do for many years and holds a black belt. He also enjoys swimming, bicycle riding, tennis and snowboarding.

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Hanging out at the Alma Mater
Artistic shot pregnant wife - would make great Gala cover
Artistic shot with pregnant wife – would make great Gala cover

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Contestant number 10:

Jakub Rutnicki from Szamotuły is a 30-year-old political science graduate and an MP representing the Civic Platform party. He was one of the finalists in the Polish edition of Pop Idol. Mr Rutnicki is a sports enthusiast and plays football and volley ball. He also completed water rescue training. In his region of Wielkopolska he organises a beach volley ball cup bearing his name.

In his own words: “The Poland of my dreams is a country where people are proud of their homeland”.

I asked for a latte, not a cappucino
I asked for a latte, not a cappucino
Oooops... If there are top secret government papers, where are the beach volleyball results?
Oooops… If these are the top secret government papers, where are the beach volleyball results?

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Due to popupar demand from our regular readers the following contestants have been added in the last moment:

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Contestant number 11:

Radosław Sikorski from Bydgoszcz is a 46-year-old PPE graduate of Oxford University, an MP and the the current Polish Minister for Foreign Affairs. Previously involved with the Kaczynski brothers’ Law and Justice party, acted as Minister of Defence in their government. Before the 2007 election he joined the Civic Platform party.

Between 1981-1989 he lived in the United Kingdom as an asylum seeker due to his involvement in Polish anti-communist opposition. During that time he worked as a correspondent for such British newspapers as The Sunday Telegrph, or The Spectator.

He is married to a well known American journalist Anne Applebaum.

At Milan Fashion Week
Bacstage at Milan Fashion Week

See me in my room
– Would you be so kind and join our war? Pleaaase? – Oh… I don’t know…

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Contestant number 12:

Wojciech Olejniczak is a 35-year-old MP (since 2001) from Łódź representing the Democratic Left Alliance (social-democrats, heirs to the communist party). He is a farming market graduate and management graduate at the Warsaw University of Life Sciences, holding a PhD degree in economics.  Between 1999 and 2000 he was the president of Peasant Youth Association. From 2005-2008 he was the chairman of his party. During the Leszek Miller government he acted as the Minister of Agriculture.

Inteviewed by Joan Rivers - live from the red carpet

Inteviewed by Joan Rivers - live from the red carpet

Mr Olejniczak and his drag performance

Mr Olejniczak and his drag performance

Vote now!

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The Hottest Polish Politician Contest

THERE’S MORE LIKE THIS ON OUR NEW SITE – POLANDIAN.COM

Don’t watch the news?! – See what you’ve been missing! Polandian presents the best looking and sexiest lads and lasses in Polish politics… We are looking for one guy and one gal to become the Hottest Polish Polish Politician of the year.  We will send the lucky winner a bilingual diploma they can hang in their office and show off to their friends.

This week we’re voting for the sexiest female politician. Come back next week to vote for the men!

Contestant number 1

Iwona Guzowska is a 33-year-old multiple World Championship medalist in kick-boxing and boxing from Gdańsk and has been an MP since 2007. She represents the Civic Platform Party (PO, centre-right).

She is involved in charities that aid sick children.

Diplomatic mission
Diplomatic mission
Working on political power
Strong-arm tactics

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Contestant number 2:

Iwona Arent from Olsztyn – this 41-year-old member of Law and Justice party (PiS; conservative/social-right) has been an MP since 2006. She is a political scientist.

In her own words: “I got my patriotism from my grandparents, my grandfather was a Home Army soldier sent to Siberia after the war. The tales I heard from my grandfather, grandmother and parents shaped my love for Poland.”

Style and grace... is that Jennifer Aniston hairdo?
Style and grace… is that a Jennifer Aniston hairdo?
Obligatory Sejm photo
Obligatory Sejm photo

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Contestant number 3

Magda Gąsior-Marek is a 26-year-old banking graduate and an MP from Lublin. She joined the Civic Platform party in 2005 and her political star launched soon after. She soon won a Lublin City Council seat and then made it into the Sejm.  She promotes blood donation and good manners on the roads.

Her political idols are: Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński, Margaret Thatcher, Eugeniusz Kwiatkowski, Mother Teresa of Calcutta, St. Maximillian Maria Kolbe, Milton Friedman and Adam Smith.

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Look mum, I’m in the Sejm!
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Likes to spend time around men with big choppers

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Contestant number 4

Małgorzata Tkacz-Janik is a 44-year-old member of the Zieloni 2004 Party (The Greens) in Gliwice. She’s an academic and social activist and a specialist in the theory of literature and marketing communication. She organises conferences about sustainable development in her home town of Gliwice and motivational trainings for unemployed women.

In her own words: “Three issues are most important for me in my political and life plan: the rights of women, the quality of life where one lives, and social and cultural education of children, youth and adults.”

The sultry, flyaway look
Mhmmmmm...
Put it away dear, you’re impressing nobody

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Contestant number 5

Lidia Geringer de Oedenberg is a 50-year-old painter and journalist from Wrocław and has been a member of the European Parliament since 2004. She is a member of the Democratic Left Alliance (social-democrats, heirs of the communist party). In the European Parliament she represents the Party of European Socialists. She graduated from Wrocław University of Economics. For ten years she worked as a general manager of the international classical music festival Vratislavia Cantans. For four years she held the post of Director of the Witold Lutosławski Philharmonic of Wrocław.

Yes. I do know what you're thinking
Yes. I do know what you’re thinking

Some people love to work after hours
Some people love to work after hours

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Contestant number 6:

Joanna Mucha is a 33-year-old academic and MP from Lublin, a city she has represented since 2007. She works as an economics lecturer (specialising in the economics of healthcare) at the Catholic University of Lublin. She represents the Civic Platform party (centre-right).

In her own words: “For me politics means service to the people – this will never change. I have been interested in national matters since I was very young, and I always wanted to participate in politics because I know I am an honest, trustworthy and hardworking person. Now I also have a large knowledge, which I would like to use for the benefit of our country”.

Come over here and say that punk
Come over here and say that punk

Stepping out in style
Stepping out in style

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Contestant number 7:

Elżbieta Łukacijewska is a 42-year-old MP from Sanok (since 2001). Holding a Masters in business administration she worked as an accountant. In 1998 she was voted village administrator of Cisna (podkarpacie region). She represents the Civic Platform party (centre-right). She is the former president of the Sejm Commmision for Equal Status of Men and Women.

In her own words: “From my parents I learned to respect other people and their work. I observed their everyday effort, honesty and attachment to the land. Their struggles and difficulties taught me a lot.”

Friendly and elegant
Friendly and elegant
Mental note: don't give speeches when you're hungry
Mental note: don’t give speeches when you’re hungry

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Contestant number 8:

Katarzyna Matusik-Lipiec is a 33-year-old Civic Platform MP from Kraków, a city she has represented since 2007. After graduating from political science at the Jagiellonian University, she started working in an association promoting knowledge about the EU. For five years she was engaged in local government of the City of Kraków.

In her own words: “To deal with everyday duties I always try to find time for sports: skiing, swimming, roller skating. Less actively, but just as passionately, I am a fan of the Polish volleyball team”.

I always like to sign with a kiss
I always like to sign with a kiss

Better three hours early than a minute too late
Better three hours early than a minute too late

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Contestant number 9:

Małgorzata Kidawa-Błońska is a 52-year-old sociologist, film producer and an MP from Warsaw. For several years she represented the liberal-democratic Unia Wolności party in the Warsaw City Council. Currently she is a member of centre-right Platforma Obywatelska.

She takes special pride in being the grand-daughter of important Polish politicians: Stanisław Wojciechowski (President of Poland 1922-26) and Władysław Grabski (Prime Minister of Poland in 1920 and from 1923-25; architect of currency reformer – creator of the złoty).

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Vogue
Why do they always put the salt sticks on your side?!
Why do they always put the salt sticks on your side?!

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Contestant number 10:

Marzena Okła-Drewnowicz is a 36-year-old sociologist, social activist and an MP from Skarżysko-Kamienna. Since 2007 she has represented the Civic Platform party.  She has worked as a manager for social services in the Świętokrzyskie region and as a facilitator of trainings for social workers. She was actively engaged in numerous local non-governmental initiatives. Her best achievement is probably a charity organising free time for children from underprivileged backgrounds – which flourished when she took lead there.

Xxx
The Cheri Blair of a new generation

Explaining the Dutch delegation why they should adopt the Polish values
If this guy gives me one more flower I’m going to slap him

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Vote now!

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F*** The Asterisks

Just when the residents of Poland could start stopping remembering BDSM sections of their history (for who needs the notion of “nation” today?) – many Polish (headbanging) heads will get reinforced in their probable jingo-pride by bands such as Marduk or Sabaton. That both come from Sweden – to make money on Polishful sentiments — I can’t take their songs as any retribution for what XVII cent.’s Sweden stole from Poles (who had stolen the stuff some time earlier).

The Marduk guys sing (?) about Warszawa of WW2.

Or so they imagine.

(Btw, Lennon’s whining remade into…Imagine there’s no Warsaw, it’s easy if you try. No hell below us, it’s just the Reich above would be a better attempt at artistic provocation.) Apres les Suedois le deluge – let’s flood Marduk with condescending smiles. Their lyrics could be just about anything — selling pancakes or seeing funny road signs — as long as the chorus should include “Warschau” (repeat three times). The title is in German (warum? geh figurieren, easier to sing (?) than “Warszawa”, plus the German market is mighty big) — and still some youtubers can’t spell it right. — Warshau? Warshaw? — Tell me about wasted education.

The latter band, Sabaton, is more dangerous – they sing intelligibly.

Be gone! Who in their sane mind cares about “Polish Thermopylae” — especially when no one cares about the Greek original? From a military p.o.v., the song does not sound sound either. Poland was defeated at Wizna. The bodycount ratio “40 to 1” means nothing to Darth Vader – or to Paul Tibbets, a guy who survived (!) to talk about his singlehanded victory (!).

Still, the now masses of Polish ingrammaticados, poor commanders of English, hurry to express their occasional love for Polish CO’s who chose to die of grenadosis. (Compare the evergreen, 0:55-02:55.) It does not matter you’re defeated, it matters how you sustain your defeats, Poles will often think.
“Blow wind, come, wrack! At least we’ll die with harness on our back!”

It nearly rhymes with: “Let stones crack! Let the earth quake!”. Yes, it can be nice to listen to “these words are for you Poland” by Laibach (the German name more catchy again), but do we notice the song hails “all the communists” as well?

So, have we asked for it? Heavy metal and heavy weather?

Recently, Mother Nature has provided parts of Poland with hailbombs and whirlwinds. Which reminded me of not so recent floods. And of the fact that:

That’s what Polish PM’s have to do — apologize for words of reason. It happens when instead of letting the country grow evenly richer, middle-class way – they let the nation divide into the dramatically poor against the dramatically rich, and many chewing on the opium for the masses – the recalling of the days of old glory (of defeats).

PS The title of the post refers to a Giles Coren who used the asterisk-free phrase “Fuck the Poles” in his email, so I read. Test your Polishness now: can you care less?

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– – – – –
(I cannot.)

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A Guide To Songs About Poland, Heavily YouTube Loaded

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There was a time I envied Hungary a bit of a lot:

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Jethro Tull, my band #1 to take to an inhabited tropical island (or wherever my pension is going to take me) gave out a song “Budapest”. Before the ultimate tearing the Iron Curtain off and away, and today, too, to a certain extent, the national pride of Poland had longed for any honourable mentions in Western production. So that we’d know the civilised world knows we’re not a Russian colony with no history or ambitions.

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We would idolise people feeding our starving egos – like Marino Marini, a medium-popular Italian songster with a one-timer in heavily-accented Polish (but damn, the song is so sentimentally kitsch it’s beautiful):

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Or like Classix Nouveaux. (They’ll never never come out of my mobile). The problem with bands like CN was they would requite the love Poles felt for them — but were not recognised too worldly.

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And Poles would probably remind an English or German foreigner some internationally famous tunes may be of Polish origin.

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Or that Polish Roman Polański directed a movie about Polish Władysław Szpilman playing Polish Fryderyk Szopen. If music should not be enough:

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Or that Gazebo would sing “I like Chopin” [but did he mean Chopin vodka?].

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Or that Midnight Oil sing about Kościuszko, though Aussies misspell and mispronounce him and often think he’s just a mount.

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Or we would speak of Charles Bronson, who was Polish (oh really?), and a harmonica virtuoso.

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Or we would be happy Maidens want us to play pray with them:

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Or that they visit our airports.

That they visit our cities.

That they play our football.

That they see our people.

That they attend our weddings.

So that they could say “Na zdrowie”:

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Or that U2 made a Solidarnosc-inspired song (for which Poles would pay back waving their shirts the other time).

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Or Kim Wilde? Long before she was covered in Cambodia by Apoptygma Berzerk, Polish “affectionate people” had covered her with flowers and kisses and kisses and improvised dancing, live, probably to thank her she came to us capable of saying “Cześć” or “Dziękuję”:

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Hey, we even liked strangers when their admiration came through imitation. For example: Vox, the first Polish boys-will-be-boys-band, singing about aloha-sunny-banana way of life when it was grey and communist outside. The song has been kicking arse, amen. And it still kicks, even if in a Czech remake meant for a TV commercial.

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Our hearts soar when someone such as Eddie Vedder speaks Polish (even if it’s read, and it’s B16 Polish more than Polish Polish).

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Yes, our depression could be low.

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So, what more?

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This premiere-league metal musician took Danzig for his alias. (And Danzig is German for Gdańsk. Hurrah!)

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And then there’s Christopher Poland. (What a nice surname!)

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Any common denominator? Considering Chris got himself into metal albums, and that I found heavy bands like these Danes, it seems the natural way you would musically relate to Poland would be loud and clearly hard.

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Type O Negative is a first class metal band, and its core-man is Peter Steele, born Ratajczyk. Just when one could boast his Polish surname, one would learn Peter sings about faeces, or women that cheat on him, that he posed for Playgirl, that he was clinically treated for depression, or that he converted from atheism to Catholicism. Let’s be confused: is it good PR, or not?

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There are exports, too (to boost up our pride aware of them admiring our guys).

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Vader – the best (selling) thing in music from Poland (*).
I still recall the thrill of the time I saw
the first Polish words on MTVfirst Polish words on MTV, a Polish ballet dancer, a Polish power plant, lots of first class loudness in their video. On the other hand, Vader is not a Polish name, the band IS good (while goodness is international) and singing in English. [And how! Uttering loud lines “We await the silent empire” and “We do believe in silence” is clear irony and wit, and they will discuss stuff like for-snobs-only Pynchonisms, with unprecedented speed (try to say “You’d better never antagonize the horn” in 0.8 second).]

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(*) Since that etude thing Chopin wrote. Yes, that borrowing from a prelude by Birkin. The lending to Beyond The Sea. Yes, the song in American…Or’s it English?…French?…Or Corsican French?…Or French-English on Japanese tv? — It’s all one, anyway.
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Anyway. Jethro Tull went on with “Budapest” for 10 minutes long and more. This could hurt the national pride of a non-Hungarian. Despite the fact Poles and Hungarians have been considered “brethren”. (We don’t speak our brother’s language, we don’t see one another too often, we hardly shared borders. Yes, warm feelings are feasible.)

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Granted, Jethro Tull mentions Poland alright (“the beat of distant Africa or a Polish factory town”) but that’s not quite what I’d expect. I mean — where’s a song entitled “Warsaw”?

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Well, I’ll tell you where.

Joy Division.
Porcupine Tree.
David Bowie (with Brian Eno).

Plus Tangerine Dream (with Poland) ?
Plus Niemen in French?

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Not often a place earns a Babylonian god’s song with German title, English words, Swedish voice.
Not always a madam’s cul in that place gets a mention in a French song, Belgian voice, first verse.
Not bad. Not bad at all.

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PS But now I am going to listen to Laibach. Whose “words are for you, Poland”, says the third sentence, and the beginning rings the bell in its unmistakenly Polish way.

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I can’t dance, I can’t sing.

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10 things that make Polish people laugh

THERE’S MORE LIKE THIS ON OUR NEW SITE – POLANDIAN.COM

Sensitive content warning: this post contains sexual references and swearing, which some people may find offensive.

There are some things that make everybody laugh regardless of their cultural background. There are, however, some differences in sense of humour between nations. Even in the English-speaking world, some things that are dead serious to Americans seem incredibly funny to the British (and probably vice-versa).
Here’s a subjective list of things that are guaranteed to make Poles laugh:

1. The Czech language

The thought that a language might make people laugh may sound surprising, but it’s true. The Czech language sounds ridiculously funny to the Polish ear. Although both languages derive from a common core and have many similarities they evolved for centuries on their own. Most Czech words sound to Poles like diminutives of their own words, pronounced with an awkward accent, which could be likened to dwarf-speak. What is more, many similar-looking and sounding words have completely different meanings. Simple notices about bus departures at a bus station in the Czech Republic can make a Polish person laugh like crazy; the Czech word for ‘departures’ means ‘faeces’ in Polish. ‘Laska’ (Czech for love) is Polish for ‘blow job.’ I could go on like this for a long time. Anything, which would be normally regarded as funny – when it has the Czech factor added – leads to Poles going completely mental.

An example of Czech language:

and again, with modern audio:

2. Foreign people speaking Polish

Foreign people speaking Polish, or foreign people generally, used to be a very rare thing in Poland. Hearing them speaking Polish is always entertaining. If you’re a foreigner and you want to make the atmosphere more relaxed, say something in Polish (and try to squeeze in some mistakes). Poles will be impressed by your effort to learn their language, that many people regard as difficult (but don’t be fooled, it’s pretty easy).

Example of foreign people speaking Polish:

3. Politics

Political jokes and political satire during communist times were a way of coping with the annoyances of the system. And there was always something to laugh about. There was a saying that Poland was “the merriest barrack in the communist camp.” This approach to politics continues today, and it has to be acknowledged that Polish politicians basically write scripts for comedians with their irrational acts.

Polish politics meets The Muppets

4. Poland

This might come as a surprise, but Poles love to laugh at themselves (but they don’t like it when others do so) and everything that is substandard, weird, awkward, broken, or baldly organised in this country.

5. Westerners

The way that westerners don’t understand some things about Polish reality makes many people laugh (and others sigh). Westerners used to be particularly funny in the past, when Polish reality was more complicated, and they were thought to be unable to comprehend it. The lost foreigner used to be a regular feature in Polish comedy films and series.

6. Hong Kong

Look how people laugh when you mention Hong Kong

7. Peasant people

Years of communism and appreciating the working class and peasant people didn’t really work on the Poles. Peasant people or unqualified workers are commonly associated with inarticulate language, bad grammar, poor vocabulary, tasteless demeanour and occasional problems with personal hygiene. They are a constant source of fun for urban and middle-class Poles. They are mercilessly mocked by the whole pop-culture.
(Stereo)typical peasant person (here fragments of a genuine local election advert):

Poles are in fact huge snobs.

8. Lack of general knowledge

As stated above, Polish people have a tendency towards snobishness. This, combined with an education system focused on feeding students general knowledge basics from all disciplines, makes Polish people sensitive to signs of lack there-of. Not knowing the capital of Bolivia, the main river in Russia, or the exact date of the battle of Racławice, can put you to shame. Be warned. Have ways of escaping questions of this kind in advance. Or you might become a laughing stock.

9. Mohair berets.

Mohair Berets

In the Polish army different beret colours stand for different departments in the army. Mohair berets stand for the elderly ladies (babcias), followers of a local powerful conservative ultra/pseudo-Catholic televangelist leader. Mohair berets is their favourite headgear – and the faithfulness and discipline they they display resembles that of the army – hence the name. Mohair berets are guardians of the social order as they see it. Although in popular belief mohair berets are perceived as blind-to-argument, overwhelmed by all sorts of conspiracy theories, uneducated, aggressive, and xenophobic.

Cabaret mocking mohair berets:

Mohair beret lady arguing her political views calls a street seller speaking for news tv a ‘bitch’:

10. Psychodelic Christian music-videos

Here is the original, aired on a Catholic show on Polish public tv with a genuine Catholic bishop. “Christian is dancing”
Remake
Cocaine-LSD remix
Then came mathematics remake “ Parabolas are dancing”


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